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 The 100 Greatest Directors of All-Time

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PostSubject: Re: The 100 Greatest Directors of All-Time   Sun Nov 22, 2009 10:17 am

fustyruk
Posted: Sat Oct 20, 2007 11:26 pm

tamartin wrote:
I'll take a swipe at it:

1. John Ford
2. D.W. Griffith
3. Charlie Chaplin
4. Elia Kazan
5. Federico Fellini
6. Akira Kurisawa
7. John Huston
8. Ingmar Bergman
9. Otto Von Stroeheim
10. Stanley Kubrick

Nice top ten but where is Alfred Hitchcock? The man defined a few genres and broke ground in television production as well as film.

Great work Whammon!
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PostSubject: Re: The 100 Greatest Directors of All-Time   Sun Nov 22, 2009 10:18 am

tamartin
Posted: Sun Oct 21, 2007 10:29 am

fustyruk wrote:


Nice top ten but where is Alfred Hitchcock? The man defined a few genres and broke ground in television production as well as film.

Great work Whammon!

Hitchcock is somewhere in my top twenty, but I have the same problem putting him in the top ten that I do with Keaton, they're both more brilliant technicians than artists. If you were teaching a class on the nuts and bolts of filmmaking you would have to show Rear Window, Psycho, College and the General.

Also I've had too many psychology classes, and like women too much to really enjoy Hitchcock movies. Watch Frenzy or Vertigo and you'll see my point.
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PostSubject: Re: The 100 Greatest Directors of All-Time   Sun Nov 22, 2009 10:18 am

whammon
Posted: Wed Oct 31, 2007 1:40 pm

I'm back from my sister's wedding, and with any luck, I'll be done with this list by Christmas. Let's resume.

50. Michael Moore
Unless you vote for liberal candidates on a regular basis, you probably won’t agree with his politics or his style, but you have to admit the man is effective as a documentarian. People pay attention to what he has to say, even if it’s just to lambaste him later. Beginning his career in 1989 with “Roger and Me,” Moore quickly established himself as a divisive force in documentary cinema. Constantly hounding General Motors CEO Roger Smith, he eventually confronts him and shows him all the damage done to Moore’s hometown of Flint, Michigan, portraying it as a direct result of Smith and GM’s downsizing in the area. The film began a trend for Moore. With every documentary, he, as the director, would put himself in front of the camera, confront his subjects in a very curmudgeon-like way, ask them loaded questions, and make public scenes to prove his point. His other main tactic is to play news clips and press conferences of his subjects, but playing more than network news does, cutting it after they say or do something to prove his point. Oddly enough, the follow-up to “Roger and Me,” was his only work of fiction (an arguable point if you don’t agree with his politics and methodology), 1995’s “Canadian Bacon.” The movie, which even as a fiction still fits his style, centers around an American president who, desperate for a boost in his approval ratings, starts a cold war with Canada. Moore’s biggest successes, and biggest controversies, began in 2002 with the release of “Bowling for Columbine.” A reference to a 1999 school shooting in which 15 students and teachers were killed, Moore explored America’s fascination with guns and gun violence. He never comes to a solid conclusion, but still ruffles feathers along the way, including then National Rifle Association president Charleton Heston. Moore earned an Oscar for Best Feature Documentary, and further controversy ensued. The Oscar ceremony was held shortly after the launch of the Iraq War, so during an acceptance speech where he, like all other nominees, was asked not to be political, he gave his infamous “fictitious war” speech, drawing a mix of cheers and boos from the crowd. He followed his public scene with “Fahrenheit 9/11,” which can basically be summed up with “Don’t vote for Bush in 2004.” The entire film is actually a bit of a departure for Moore. He only shows up on camera once in the film, asking Congressmen who voted for the Iraq War to enlist their own children for the war effort. The rest of his film is mostly a narrated montage of news clips, again extended to further his points (the most famous being Bush saying “We’ll get those terrorists,” then backing up to drive a golf ball), made to illustrate the President’s relationship with the Saudi royal family, his refusal to detain the bin Laden family after the 9/11 attack, and his obsession with Iraq despite no link to the attack. Moore won the Golden Palm at Cannes for his effort, but failed in his ultimate goal. He is currently working on a sequel to be released for the 2008 election. His most recent film, “Sicko,” is an oddity of sorts. The oddest part: even conservative news outlets like Fox News have endorsed it. Returning to his curmudgeon style of performing public stunts (in this case, taking 9/11 rescue workers to Guantanamo Bay, Cuba to get the free healthcare the prisoners get), Moore contrasts America’s private health care systems, which pick and choose what they will cover and when, while charging people gross amounts of money, with the national health systems of France, Canada, England, and Cuba, where drug costs are low, if even existent, and hospital care is free. He also contrasts the arguments American politicians make against national health care with cases to the contrary, as well as mentioning how much money each of those politicians gets in campaign contributions and future employment from private companies.
Noteworthy Films: Roger and Me, Canadian Bacon, The Big One, Bowling for Columbine, Fahrenheit 9/11, Sicko
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PostSubject: Re: The 100 Greatest Directors of All-Time   Sun Nov 22, 2009 10:28 am

narrator
Posted: Wed Oct 31, 2007 4:43 pm

Moore better than Burton? Don't know I'd agree with that.
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PostSubject: Re: The 100 Greatest Directors of All-Time   Sun Nov 22, 2009 10:29 am

Redbob86
Posted: Wed Oct 31, 2007 5:53 pm

narrator wrote:
Moore better than Burton? Don't know I'd agree with that.

Agreed.

http://www.newgrounds.com/portal/view/189866
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PostSubject: Re: The 100 Greatest Directors of All-Time   Sun Nov 22, 2009 10:29 am

whammon
Posted: Thu Nov 01, 2007 1:55 pm

49. John Landis
There was basically no such thing as a comedy in the late 1970s-80s if John Landis wasn’t at the helm. He made his debut with “Schlock,” in 1973, but he didn’t get major recognition for another four years. His second film, “The Kentucky Fried Movie,” remains to this day the pinnacle of sketch films. In 1978, on a shoestring budget, and with only one star at the time, “Saturday Night Live’s” John Belushi, Landis gave us the all-time comedy classic, “National Lampoon’s Animal House.” The film launched Kevin Bacon’s career, as well as inspired every college toga party held since. Although set in the 60s, the film’s raunchiness and drunken rebellion still resonate today, landing the film on AFI’s Comedy List (#36). Landis would work with Belushi once more before his death, in 1980’s “The Blues Brothers.” A year later, Landis would be at the helm of one of the greatest films ever to combine comedy and horror, “An American Werewolf in London.” The makeup effects during the famous transformation scene, and the constantly decaying state of the dead ghouls earned the film an Oscar, and today it ranks as the #42 scariest movie of all time, according to Bravo TV. It was these groundbreaking makeup effects that led to a rather ambitious side project for Landis. In 1983, he directed Michael Jackson’s “Thriller” video, a 15-minute miniature horror film, transforming Jackson and his dancers into werewolves and zombies. To this day it remains the standard by which all music videos are judged. He would later direct another Jackson video, the much hyped 1991 short, “Black or White.” As the 80s closed, Landis was at the helm of more noteworthy comedies, among them the Eddie Murphy classic, “Coming to America,” which basically began the trend Murphy has of playing nearly every character himself. As the 90s came along, however, Landis’s career started to flag. He has since earned three Razzie nominations for Worst Director, in 1991 for “Oscar,” in 1994 for “Beverly Hills Cop III,” and again in 1996 for “The Stupids.”
Noteworthy Films: Schlock, The Kentucky Fried Movie, National Lampoon’s Animal House, The Blues Brothers, An American Werewolf in London, Trading Places, Spies Like Us, Three Amigos, Coming to America, Oscar, Beverly Hills Cop III, The Stupids
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PostSubject: Re: The 100 Greatest Directors of All-Time   Sun Nov 22, 2009 10:30 am

Outlaw
Posted: Sat Nov 03, 2007 12:56 am

narrator wrote:
Moore better than Burton? Don't know I'd agree with that.
Yeah. Even though I'm more left leaning in my politics, I think he's an idiot. Although I've only seen Bowling for Columbine. And I couldn't stand the dumbfuck enough to even watch all of it. So no, I don't really pay any attention to what he says. I guess I just have a very low tolerance for stupidity.

As far as the top ten goes, I don't think I've seen him on this list yet, but in this condition I'm not sure and don't have the patience to look.. But I think Scorcese should be in the top ten.
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PostSubject: Re: The 100 Greatest Directors of All-Time   Sun Nov 22, 2009 10:31 am

narrator
Posted: Sat Nov 03, 2007 1:02 am

Outlaw wrote:
narrator wrote:
Moore better than Burton? Don't know I'd agree with that.
Yeah. Even though I'm more left leaning in my politics, I think he's an idiot. Although I've only seen Bowling for Columbine. And I couldn't stand the dumbfuck enough to even watch all of it. So no, I don't really pay any attention to what he says. I guess I just have a very low tolerance for stupidity.

As far as the top ten goes, I don't think I've seen him on this list yet, but in this condition I'm not sure and don't have the patience to look.. But I think Scorcese should be in the top ten.

Well, not just that, but Burton has always seemed to have more directorial and artistic vision. Moore's style of documentaries seems to suit college thesis papers, in terms of what stays in and what comes out.
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PostSubject: Re: The 100 Greatest Directors of All-Time   Sun Nov 22, 2009 10:31 am

Redbob86
Posted: Sat Nov 03, 2007 10:56 am

Tim Burton definitly got robbed here.
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PostSubject: Re: The 100 Greatest Directors of All-Time   Sun Nov 22, 2009 10:32 am

whammon
Posted: Sat Nov 03, 2007 2:17 pm

Curious, is all this indignation because of Michael Moore's inclusion at all, or the fact that he's a mere five spots higher than Tim Burton?
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PostSubject: Re: The 100 Greatest Directors of All-Time   Sun Nov 22, 2009 10:33 am

narrator
Posted: Sat Nov 03, 2007 2:31 pm

whammon wrote:
Curious, is all this indignation because of Michael Moore's inclusion at all, or the fact that he's a mere five spots higher than Tim Burton?

lol I had no doubt in my mind that Moore would be on the list. He is a standout* in terms of documentarians, but be it five higher or fifty higher, higher is higher. I'd probably be the same way if Moore was only one higher than Burton.

*by standout, I don't mean outstanding, necessarily, but more in terms of pure name recognition. Honestly, offhand, I don't know that I could name another documentarian besides Moore.
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PostSubject: Re: The 100 Greatest Directors of All-Time   Sun Nov 22, 2009 10:33 am

Outlaw
Posted: Sun Nov 04, 2007 3:11 am

whammon wrote:
Curious, is all this indignation because of Michael Moore's inclusion at all, or the fact that he's a mere five spots higher than Tim Burton?

I just think he's an idiot.
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PostSubject: Re: The 100 Greatest Directors of All-Time   Sun Nov 22, 2009 10:35 am

jbcoops
Posted: Mon Nov 05, 2007 11:12 am

Outlaw wrote:
whammon wrote:
Curious, is all this indignation because of Michael Moore's inclusion at all, or the fact that he's a mere five spots higher than Tim Burton?
I just think he's an idiot.
funny... he says the same about you! Laughing Twisted Evil Rolling Eyes
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PostSubject: Re: The 100 Greatest Directors of All-Time   Sun Nov 22, 2009 10:35 am

whammon
Posted: Tue Nov 06, 2007 4:59 pm

48. Terry Gilliam
The only American member of Monty Python, Gilliam was originally in charge of the animation sequences for the comedy troupe, as well as writing and performing in the sketches with the others. This translated into his directing a few animated shorts outside of Monty Python before earning his first feature-length credit, “Monty Python and the Holy Grail,” which he shared with fellow Python Terry Jones. He had his first major success outside of the group with 1981’s “Time Bandits,” for which he received Saturn nominations. He’d reunite with Terry Jones and take the helm for one more Monty Python film, “The Meaning of Life,” before striking out on his own, creating a brand for himself of semi-surreal, dramatic sci-fi and action films. He earned an Oscar nomination for Writing in 1985 for “Brazil,” which is considered his magnum opus. Six years later he won the Silver Lion at the Venice Film Festival for “The Fisher King,” which among other things, solidified Robin Williams’s place as a dramatic actor as well as comedic. In 1995, he directed “Twelve Monkeys,” which quickly became an audience favorite, as well as being one of the “must have” standards when DVDs became popular. In 1998 he departed from his usual niche with “Fear and Loathing in Las Vegas,” although given the source material, Hunter S. Thompson’s book, it was no less surreal. Gilliam earned a Golden Palm nomination at Cannes. His most recent major project was 2005’s “The Brothers Grimm,” about the fairy tale writers and their “inspiration” for their stories. The film received mixed reviews, as the themes and story seemed a bit watered down for Gilliam’s style. Still, he earned a Golden Lion nomination at Venice.
Noteworthy Films: Monty Python and the Holy Grail, Jabberwocky, Time Bandits, The Meaning of Life, Brazil, The Fisher King, Twelve Monkeys, Fear and Loathing in Las Vegas, The Brothers Grimm, Tideland
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PostSubject: Re: The 100 Greatest Directors of All-Time   Sun Nov 22, 2009 10:36 am

jbcoops
Posted: Tue Nov 06, 2007 9:52 pm

I saw "Brazil" at Wheeler Auditorium at Cal, along with 800 or so other students. Terry Gilliam was there and fielded questions. I was in the very back and yet managed to ask him what it was like to work with Tom Stoppard (famous playwright and writer on Brazil). I think I was too stoned at the time to remember his answer, but I do remember thinking "hey... I got to ask Terry Gilliam a question even though I'm sitting in the back row."
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PostSubject: Re: The 100 Greatest Directors of All-Time   Sun Nov 22, 2009 10:37 am

whammon
Posted: Tue Nov 13, 2007 4:27 pm

47. Ron Howard
Beginning his road to fame as a young actor in TV shows (Opie in “The Andy Griffith Show” and Richie Cunningham in “Happy Days”) and movies (“American Graffiti”), Ron Howard is an anomaly amongst child stars, in that he never got mixed up in criminal lifestyles (mostly due to his upbringing; his father did everything possible to make sure his childhood was as normal as possible), and he still not only works, he’s very successful. His transition from acting to directing took a bit of bargaining. He struck a deal with Roger Corman to star in his film, “Eat My Dust.” In return, Corman would produce and finance Howard’s directorial debut, “Grand Theft Auto.” After directing TV movies through the early part of the 1980s, Howard hit the big time with “Splash.” The film did very well at the box office (despite one of the most absurd premises in cinema history) and began a collaborative friendship with actor Tom Hanks that exists to this day. In 1985, Howard broke new ground in sci-fi with “Cocoon,” and since that time, has had great success with nearly every film he’s helmed. The secret to Howard’s success is in his characters. He never stays in one genre. He’s done sci-fi (“Cocoon”), fantasy (“Willow”), action (“Backdraft”), romance (“Far and Away”), history (“Apollo 13”), and family films (“How the Grinch Stole Christmas”) amongst others. The reason he’s been universally successful is that he makes the audience care about the characters. He illustrates the almost romantic humanity in every lead character he puts on screen, even if it’s a mermaid, a dwarf, or a Grinch. It’s because of this built-in human drama that two of his films have ended up on AFI’s list of the most Inspirational films. “A Beautiful Mind” ranks at #92 and “Apollo 13” at #12. Howard received two Oscars for “A Beautiful Mind,” in 2001, his first nominations in his long career, winning both Best Director and Best Picture.
Noteworthy Films: Grand Theft Auto, Night Shift, Splash, Cocoon, Willow, Parenthood, Backdraft, Far and Away, Apollo 13, Ransom, EdTV, How the Grinch Stole Christmas, A Beautiful Mind, Cinderella Man, The Da Vinci Code
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PostSubject: Re: The 100 Greatest Directors of All-Time   Sun Nov 22, 2009 10:37 am

Sassenach
Posted: Sat Nov 17, 2007 7:11 pm

whammon wrote:
I'll be releasing one name a day, maybe more, until the list is complete,

Slacker.
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PostSubject: Re: The 100 Greatest Directors of All-Time   Sun Nov 22, 2009 10:38 am

jbcoops
Posted: Sat Nov 17, 2007 7:19 pm

Sassenach wrote:
whammon wrote:
I'll be releasing one name a day, maybe more, until the list is complete,
Slacker.
biyatch!
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PostSubject: Re: The 100 Greatest Directors of All-Time   Sun Nov 22, 2009 10:39 am

whammon
Posted: Sat Nov 17, 2007 10:10 pm

Real life comes first, and part of that real life involves sleeping after working all night. I also said that with any luck, I'd be done by Christmas, and when I said that, there were more than 50 days till Christmas. That should have been a hint that I wouldn't be keeping up as often as I'd like.
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PostSubject: Re: The 100 Greatest Directors of All-Time   Sun Nov 22, 2009 10:39 am

jbcoops
Posted: Sat Nov 17, 2007 10:39 pm

whammon wrote:
Real life comes first, and part of that real life involves sleeping after working all night. I also said that with any luck, I'd be done by Christmas, and when I said that, there were more than 50 days till Christmas. That should have been a hint that I wouldn't be keeping up as often as I'd like.
you tell her Fester!

i can wait!
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PostSubject: Re: The 100 Greatest Directors of All-Time   Sun Nov 22, 2009 10:40 am

whammon
Posted: Mon Nov 26, 2007 11:13 am

46. Sydney Pollack
Perhaps best known for delivering one of the most important set-up lines in cinematic history, Sydney Pollack has been prominently featured as one of Hollywood’s top directors for more than four decades. Beginning his career as a stage and television actor, he later translated that to episode directing, including such shows as “The Alfred Hitchcock Hour” and “The Fugitive.” After appearing alongside Robert Redford in 1962’s “War Hunt,” the two forged a relationship which continues to this day. Three years later, Pollack made his feature length debut with “The Slender Thread.” A year later, he directed the first of seven films starring his friend Redford, placing him opposite the late Natalie Wood in “This Property is Condemned.” In 1969, he made his first big splash on the awards circuit, earning an Oscar nomination for Best Director for “They Shoot Horses, Don’t They?” 1972’s “Jeremiah Johnson” earned Pollack his first Golden Palm nomination at Cannes. Since then, the festival has had him back serving first as a jury member, then later as President of the jury in 1986. In 1973, he helmed “The Way We Were,” which is ranked #6 on AFI’s Romance List. 1982 saw his greatest success in comedy when he directed the Dustin Hoffman gender-bending classic, “Tootsie.” Acting in the film as George Fields, Hoffman’s agent, he gave the set-up to the whole premise of the film, “No one in this town will hire you.” The line, oddly enough, is actually very telling not only of Hoffman’s character, but of Hoffman himself, who has been described as notoriously hard to work with. The film brought feminist issues to light with fantastic grace and wit, and was named by AFI as the #2 Comedy of all time, just below “Some Like it Hot.” The film earned ten Oscar nominations, including two for Pollack (Directing and Picture). Pollack got over the Oscar hump in 1985 with “Out of Africa,” once again working with Redford. He earned two Oscars, one each for Directing and Best Picture, and the film ranks #13 on AFI’s Romance List. 2005 saw a milestone in his career, directing “The Interpreter.” The film, centering on an assassination plot of world leaders, is the first film ever to be filmed inside the United Nations General Assembly. These days, Pollack remains active as a producer, director, and actor, most recently appearing in a series of commercials for AT&T where he interrupts cell phone calls by directing the talkers, a reversal on the annoyance of cell phones interrupting movies. He also occasionally co-hosts “The Essentials” on Turner Classic Movies with Robert Osborne.
Noteworthy Films: The Slender Thread, This Property is Condemned, They Shoot Horses, Don’t They?, Jeremiah Johnson, The Way We Were, The Yakuza, Three Days of the Condor, Bobby Deerfield, Absence of Malice, Tootsie, Out of Africa, The Firm, Random Hearts, The Interpreter, Sketches of Frank Gehry
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PostSubject: Re: The 100 Greatest Directors of All-Time   Sun Nov 22, 2009 10:40 am

whammon
Posted: Sun Dec 02, 2007 11:55 am

45. Ang Lee
Having run the gamut in his short career with everything from a CGI comic book hero to a couple of gay cowboys eating pudding, Ang Lee has cemented his stature as one of Hollywood’s most powerful and sought after directors. Educated in Taiwan and the United States, his first major credit came while he was at NYU, where he served as Assistant Director for Spike Lee’s student film, “Joe’s Bed-Stuy Barbershop: We Cut Heads,” in 1983. After his schooling, he returned to Asia, where he spent the early 1990s creating a trilogy of culturally significant films. The first, 1992’s “Pushing Hands,” began the over-arching theme of generational differences within Chinese/Taiwanese culture. The next film, “The Wedding Banquet,” was Lee’s first foray into the cultural taboo of homosexuality, centering on the gay groom going through a sham marriage to appease his family. The film earned him Golden Globe nominations and an Oscar nomination for Best Foreign Language Film. Lee completed the trilogy in 1994 with “Eat Drink Man Woman,” earning another Oscar nod. The success of the trilogy earned him mainstream Hollywood deals, starting with 1995’s “Sense and Sensibility,” which earned a Best Picture nomination. It also was the first look most Americans got at Lee’s ability to capture incredible scenery with wide, brightly colorful shots. After a few more American credits, he returned home and created the opus that catapulted him to the forefront of American pop culture. “Crouching Tiger, Hidden Dragon,” is widely considered his greatest work, combining old time Asian themes and art design with a story that resonates still today, as well as jaw dropping action sequences to go along with the stunning scenery. The film won the Oscar for Best Foreign Language Film, and began a trend in the U.S. of importing similarly styled Asian martial arts films. 2005 saw his greatest critical success to date, with the release of “Brokeback Mountain.” The controversial film centering around two men in love in the 1960s-80s was praised even by its harshest detractors (most of them for the gay themes/characters) because of Lee’s continued use of breathtaking cinematography and scenery, to the point that he and the state tourism board of Wyoming had to admit that most of the scenery shots were filmed in Canada. Lee earned his first individual Oscar (Foreign Film Oscars are technically awarded to the country of first publication) as Best Director for the film, which also received two other Oscars amongst its several nominations. Lee’s currently in the spotlight again with the recent release of his latest Asian film, “Lust, Caution,” about a courtesan who seduces a government agent with the intent of killing him, only to fall in love with him.
Noteworthy Films: Pushing Hands, The Wedding Banquet, Eat Drink Man Woman, Sense and Sensibility, The Ice Storm, Ride with the Devil, Crouching Tiger, Hidden Dragon, Hulk, Brokeback Mountain, Lust, Caution
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PostSubject: Re: The 100 Greatest Directors of All-Time   Sun Nov 22, 2009 10:41 am

Redbob86
Posted: Sun Dec 02, 2007 3:44 pm

Crouching Tiger Hidden Dragon was great and all. But I can't say much for Hulk. Confused

It got so many bad reviews that they resorted to remaking it in less than 5 years.
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PostSubject: Re: The 100 Greatest Directors of All-Time   Sun Nov 22, 2009 10:42 am

whammon
Posted: Sun Dec 02, 2007 4:23 pm

As always, "Noteworthy" doesn't always mean "good."
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PostSubject: Re: The 100 Greatest Directors of All-Time   Sun Nov 22, 2009 10:42 am

narrator
Posted: Sun Jul 13, 2008 11:26 pm

I was just wondering if we were gonna get to see the last of this list. Can it be coming soon, wham?
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