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 The 100 Greatest Directors of All-Time

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PostSubject: Re: The 100 Greatest Directors of All-Time   Sun Nov 22, 2009 9:34 am

whammon
Posted: Thu Sep 27, 2007 3:44 pm[i]

77. Philip Kaufman
A double threat in Hollywood, Kaufman has had success both as a director and a screenwriter (story credit for “Raiders of the Lost Ark,” nominated for Screenwriting Oscar for “Unbearable Lightness of Being”). Kaufman has never really failed as a director. His first film, “Goldstein,” was awarded the New Critic’s Prize at Cannes in 1965. His first commercial success was a remake of “Invasion of the Body Snatchers” in 1978. In 1983 he helmed “The Right Stuff,” which won four of its eight Oscar nominations and was named by AFI as one of the 100 Most Inspirational Films of all time (ranked at #19). In 1990, he directed “Henry and June,” about the poet Henry Miller, his wife June, and their affair with French poet Anais Nin. This film has a significant place in American cinematic history, as it was the first film ever to earn the MPAA’s NC-17 rating, due to the nudity, sexuality, and pure eroticism of the story. Kaufman’s character study of sexual icons did not end there. In 2002, he helmed “Quills,” a biopic about the Marquis de Sade, which earned three Oscar nominations.
[i]Noteworthy Films: Goldstein, The Wanderers, The Right Stuff, The Unbearable Lightness of Being, Henry and June, Rising Sun, Quills
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PostSubject: Re: The 100 Greatest Directors of All-Time   Sun Nov 22, 2009 9:35 am

whammon
Posted: Fri Sep 28, 2007 6:06 pm

76. Dario Argento
The true master of Italian horror, Argento was bred for his craft. Having a famous producer for a father fueled his love of film and got his foot in the door, and exposure to the modeling world via his mother (a Brazilian model herself), may have sparked his killer instinct, as he has said publicly that he loves killing beautiful women in his movies. Starting out as a writer, his directing career began with “The Bird with the Crystal Plumage” in 1970. Making the film for his father’s studio, he insisted upon directing so that no one would mess with his script. His masterpiece is “Suspiria.” With Technicolor lighting and bright, colorful sets, the movie is almost like an acid trip on film. Argento has a few little consistencies throughout his body of work, including close-up shots of the killer’s eyes in the dark. He also appears in each film, doing all narration, and whenever you see a shot of only the killer’s hands, they’re his. His final artistic touch is to begin the end credits with “You have been watching,” followed by the film’s title.
Noteworthy Films: The Bird with the Crystal Plumage, The Cat O’Ninetails, Suspiria, Inferno, Phenomna, Opera, Trauma
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PostSubject: Re: The 100 Greatest Directors of All-Time   Sun Nov 22, 2009 9:35 am

whammon
Posted: Sat Sep 29, 2007 8:26 pm

75. Jane Campion
When we think of nudity in films, usually it’s associated with either a sex comedy or a slasher film, and the people shedding their clothes are usually buxom young actresses. Jane Campion, on the other hand, defies both conventions in her films. Her nudes are usually well established, A-list actors, and while the nudity is usually a sexual depiction, it is also artistic, dramatic, and in no way gratuitous. Among her nudes have been Meg Ryan, Holly Hunter and Harvey Keitel. The New Zealander began her directorial career with “An Exercise in Discipline – Peel” in 1982, which earned her the Golden Palm for Short Films at Cannes. She continued directing shorts until 1989, when she made her feature length debut with “Sweetie.” The film won Campion an Independent Spirit Award, and focused attention on her other main theme, non-traditional women forced into traditional roles. This dynamic was best displayed in 1993’s “The Piano,” where Holly Hunter had to play an arranged wife who has a romantic affair, with the odd mannerism of being mute, and communicating her emotions by playing her piano. The film earned her a Screenwriting Oscar and a Best Director nomination, making her one of just three women ever nominated (Lena Wertmüller and Sofia Coppola are the others).
Noteworthy Films: An Exercise in Discipline – Peel, Sweetie, An Angel at My Table, The Piano, Holy Smoke, In the Cut
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PostSubject: Re: The 100 Greatest Directors of All-Time   Sun Nov 22, 2009 9:36 am

whammon
Posted: Sun Sep 30, 2007 4:28 pm

We're a quarter of the way through.

74. Paul Greengrass
Starting his career as a television documentarian, Greengrass has made the documentary style a trademark of his fiction career. Choosing to use handheld cameras and a “fly-on-the-wall” style of point of view directing, Greengrass is able to inject a stark sense of realism into his films. His feature length debut, “Resurrected,” won two prizes at the Berlin International Film Festival. He received international acclaim for “Bloody Sunday” in 2002. In 2004, he took over the reigns of the Jason Bourne franchise, directing, “The Bourne Supremacy,” and “The Bourne Ultimatum,” both of which have fared better at the box office than their predecessor, partly because of Greengrass’s style of realism. His crowning achievement to date was 2006’s “United 93.” Securing the permission of the families of all the victims of the flight, he made what was basically a documentary with actors, using what knowledge we had available at the time, to reconstruct the fateful flight. None of the passengers, crew, or hijackers on the plane are named, except in the credits, where each of them are represented, even if they didn’t have a line. The crew on the ground actually played themselves, in what they described as a cathartic exercise, to take direction on one of the most traumatic events of their lives. Greengrass was nominated for a Best Director Oscar for his achievement, among a slew of other awards and honors.
Noteworthy Films: Resurrected, The Theory of Flight, Bloody Sunday, The Bourne Supremacy, United 93, The Bourne Ultimatum
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PostSubject: Re: The 100 Greatest Directors of All-Time   Sun Nov 22, 2009 9:37 am

whammon
Posted: Mon Oct 01, 2007 8:43 pm

73. Rob Reiner
We all knew him as “Meathead” on “All in the Family,” but his greatest success has been as a filmmaker. And perhaps it’s because of his time as a sitcom actor that he has an ear for good dialogue. Reiner’s films have produced some of the most memorable lines in film history, and have earned distinction on several of AFI’s “100 Years” lists. His directorial debut was 1984’s “This is Spinal Tap,” which to this day is the cornerstone of the “mockumentary” sub-genre of comedy (ranked #29 on the Comedy list). In 1989, “When Harry Met Sally,” revolutionized the way romantic comedies are made, bringing sex into the mainstream and juxtaposing gender roles like never before (ranked #23 on the Comedy list and “I’ll have what she’s having” ranks #33 on the Quotes list). In the 1990s, Reiner switched from comedy to more dramatic fare, and has had mixed results. “A Few Good Men” was nominated for Best Picture and “You can’t handle the truth” ranks #29 on the Quotes list. “Misery” earned Kathy Bates a Best Actress Oscar. On the other side of the spectrum, “North” and “Ghosts of Mississippi” were panned by audiences and critics, and Reiner earned Razzie nominations (Worst Picture and Worst Director for “North”). Now more of a political activist than a full-time filmmaker, Reiner still directs the occasional film, although his focus has shifted more to romance (“The American President,” “Alex & Emma,” “Rumor Has It”).
Noteworthy Films: This is Spinal Tap, Stand By Me, The Princess Bride, When Harry Met Sally, Misery, A Few Good Men, North, The American President, Ghosts of Mississippi, The Story of Us, Alex & Emma
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PostSubject: Re: The 100 Greatest Directors of All-Time   Sun Nov 22, 2009 9:37 am

narrator
Posted: Mon Oct 01, 2007 8:49 pm

I'm honestly surprised you didn't say more about "The Princess Bride." Easily one of the most quotable movies of all time, with several great lines. And imo, his best. But that's just my opinion. Still, it seems to be one of those films that absolutely everyone has seen.
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PostSubject: Re: The 100 Greatest Directors of All-Time   Sun Nov 22, 2009 9:38 am

whammon
Posted: Mon Oct 01, 2007 9:15 pm

I wanted to talk about it, cause it is one of my all-time favorite movies. Hell, when I played a Spanish merchant in a Shakespeare play in high school, my director actually told me to do Inigo Montoya. Unfortunately, since I kinda prefaced the piece with mentioning the AFI lists and whatnot, I couldn't find a way to insert it in there, since it has inexplicably not made any of AFI's lists.
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PostSubject: Re: The 100 Greatest Directors of All-Time   Sun Nov 22, 2009 9:39 am

whammon
Posted: Tue Oct 02, 2007 3:29 pm

72. Guy Hamilton
Although Hamilton has had some critical praise for his lesser known works, including awards considerations, he’s best known for his contributions to an ongoing movie franchise. Many of his early films were crime dramas based on British plays. He made his directorial debut in 1952 with “The Ringer,” about a despicable man who needs police protection. In 1957 he was nominated for the Golden Bear at the Berlin International Film Festival for “Manuela.” Two years later he earned a BAFTA Screenplay nomination for “A Touch of Larceny.” In 1964 however, he shifted gears, and took the reigns of a growing franchise of spy films, directing “Goldfinger,” which won an Oscar and is today widely considered the quintessential James Bond movie. In fact, Auric Goldfinger is the only Bond villain recognized by AFI on their “Heroes and Villains” list (he ranks #49, just above Alonzo Harris from “Training Day,” and just below Verbal Kint from “The Usual Suspects”). Hamilton would go on to direct three more Bond movies, two of which earned Oscar nominations, before calling it quits on the series, and returning to more dramatic fare involving crime and war, helming “Force 10 from Navarone” in 1978.
Noteworthy Films: Manuela, A Touch of Larceny, Goldfinger, Battle of Britain, Diamonds are Forever, Live and Let Die, The Man with the Golden Gun, Force 10 from Navarone
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PostSubject: Re: The 100 Greatest Directors of All-Time   Sun Nov 22, 2009 9:39 am

whammon
Posted: Wed Oct 03, 2007 1:31 pm

71. Gary Ross
Ross’s career body of work is small, yet significant. Starting as a writer, he earned his first Oscar nomination for penning the Tom Hanks classic, “Big” in 1988. Now a full-fledged writer/producer/director triple threat, his two films as a director are unique, stylized, and on the whole, breathtaking. Ross made his directorial debut in 1998 with “Pleasantville.” The stunning visuals of a world inside a “Father Knows Best” type of 50’s family sitcom becoming modernized and colorized right before our eyes makes this film a singular achievement. Nominated for three Oscars, the film not only made Tobey Maguire a star, it also stretched the limits of what a filmmaker can do with a keen visual eye and a good story (for which Ross also gets credit and praise). If you could call “Pleasantville” a success, then there are few words to describe his follow-up, 2003’s “Seabiscuit.” Again using Tobe Maguire in the lead (he’s also the lead in one of Ross’s two upcoming films next year, “Tokyo Suckerpunch”), Ross employed some of the most innovative camera techniques to turn a story as mundane as an underdog racing horse and jockey into one of the best films that year. Given that a typical horse race lasts only two minutes, give or take, Ross never made the racing sequences seem boring or dragged out. He’s one of the few modern directors with a sixth sense for timing his shots and scenes to keep the audience’s attention. The film was nominated for seven Oscars, including two for Ross, for Best Picture and Adapted Screenplay.
Noteworthy Films: Pleasantville, Seabiscuit
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PostSubject: Re: The 100 Greatest Directors of All-Time   Sun Nov 22, 2009 9:40 am

whammon
Posted: Fri Oct 05, 2007 2:03 pm

Double shot cause I missed yesterday.

70. Alan Crosland
You may never have heard of him, but he is quite possibly the most important figure in film history. Ever the opportunist, Crosland turned a job with the New York Globe into a small, but active role in the Edison Company as an actor and stage manager, eventually directing several silent films, including “The Unbeliever” in 1918. After being drafted into WWI, Crosland used his skills with a camera to avoid active combat duty, instead serving his time in the Army Photo Service. After the war, he signed on with Select Studios, directing ten more pictures before 1922, and gaining a reputation for being able to work with some of the most disagreeable actors in the industry, like Lionel Barrymore. After signing with Warner Brothers, he helmed the ambitious project, “Don Juan” in 1926, which was the first film to use synchronized sound and sound effects. After the massive success of “Don Juan,” and because of his ability to work with the difficult Al Jolson, Crosland directed “The Jazz Singer” in 1927. Although it had only 281 spoken words, it was the first “talkie,” and film would never be the same. The studio grossed over $3 million, a blockbuster at the time, and the transition to sound began in full force. Crosland had over 40 silent credits before “The Jazz Singer,” and continued making talkies afterward, but with little success, due to Warner Bros’ inferior Vidaphone sound systems. Crosland never equaled the success of “The Jazz Singer,” and in 1936 his career was cut short when he died from injuries sustained in a car crash. Still, Crosland has that special place in film history, as the catalyst that started a revolution in film.
Noteworthy Films: The Unbeliever, Under the Red Robe, Don Juan, The Jazz Singer, Glorious Betsy, On With the Show!, Captian Thunder, The Case of the Black Cat

69. David Lean
Known as a perfectionist and autocrat on the set, David Lean is one of the greatest British filmmakers in history. Beginning as an editor, he got his first directing credit as a co-director for “In Which We Serve” with friend Noel Coward. Lean would work with Coward on several more films, including “Brief Encounter,” which was shown at the first Cannes Film Festival, taking the Grand Prize, and earning Lean his first Best Director Oscar nomination. He then switched his influence to Charles Dickens, directing adaptations of “Great Expectations,” (Best Director nomination number two), and “Oliver Twist.” He then turned his eye to epic films on a much grander scale. Using his favorite actor, Alec Guinness, Lean directed “The Bridge on the River Kwai” in 1957. The film won seven Oscars, including Best Picture and Best Director. Lean followed with the equally amazing “Lawrence of Arabia” in 1962. It also won seven Oscars, including Best Picture and Director. It also has the unique distinction of being the only film to ever win Best Picture with no women listed in the cast credits. Lean would eventually earn seven Oscar nominations for Best Director, with the two wins, but his career started to flag in his later life, due to bad reviews. In 1990 he was awarded AFI’s Lifetime Achievement Award. In April of 1991, he died of throat cancer just before filming was set to begin on an adaptation of “Nostromo.” The film was never made.
Noteworthy Films: In Which We Serve, Brief Encounter, Great Expectations, Oliver Twist, Summertime, The Bridge on the River Kwai, Lawrence of Arabia, The Greatest Story Ever Told, Doctor Zhivago, A Passage to India
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PostSubject: Re: The 100 Greatest Directors of All-Time   Sun Nov 22, 2009 9:41 am

whammon
Posted: Sat Oct 06, 2007 4:07 pm

68. John Hughes
The man who basically defined teen movies in the 1980s, Hughes probably has just as many critics as he does fans. Introducing and perpetuating the so-called “Brat Pack” of actors (Anthony Michael Hall, Emilio Esteves, Ally Sheedy, Molly Ringwald, etc), Hughes’ early films existed within their own little universe. Set in the fictional Chicago suburb of Shermer, Illinois, his first four films (“Sixteen Candles,” “The Breakfast Club,” “Weird Science,” “Ferris Bueller’s Day Off”) all had common themes: Teenagers defying their own stereotypes (racial, ethnic, or social), low key sexuality, soundtracks that almost act as characters within the film, and authority figures (parents, police, teachers, principals) who were completely clueless. Hammering home that last point, there’s a visual pun in "Ferris Bueller’s Day Off,” where every time the parents are in his room to check on him, at least one of them is framed in nearly every shot so that a poster of the band Simple Minds is right above their heads. When his actors grew up and decided to take on more adult roles (which for many meant the end of their careers), Hughes moved on to direct more adult fare in his comedies, using more established actors (John Candy, Steve Martin, Kevin Bacon, etc). In 1991, he directed the children’s comedy, “Curly Sue,” which ended up being his last directorial effort. Converting to a producer role, he hasn’t directed a film in 17 years, and doesn’t look to be ending that drought anytime soon. Still, his films are standards of the 80s, and his work is continually referenced and studied to this day.
Noteworthy Films: Sixteen Candles, The Breakfast Club, Weird Science, Ferris Bueller’s Day Off, Plains, Trains & Automobiles, She’s Having a Baby, Uncle Buck, Curly Sue
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PostSubject: Re: The 100 Greatest Directors of All-Time   Sun Nov 22, 2009 9:41 am

whammon
Posted: Sun Oct 07, 2007 1:59 pm

67. Mike Nichols
With a career spanning more than 40 years, Nichols is in a very exclusive club. Along with the likes of Rita Moreno and Mel Brooks, Nichols is one of only nine people to earn the career “Grand Slam” on the awards circuit, winning an Oscar, an Emmy, a Grammy, and a Tony. Emigrating from Berlin in 1939, Nichols had a successful stage career, forming what would become the “Second City Improv” company. He earned his Grammy in 1961 for Best Comedy Album. As a stage director, he won seven Tonys, the first as Best Director for “Barefoot in the Park” in 1964. His film career began in 1966 with “Who’s Afraid of Virginia Woolf?” A year later, he nabbed his Oscar as Best Director for “The Graduate.” In 1970, he directed “Catch-22,” which was significant because he was the first director to ever receive a $1 million salary. In the 80s, he directed two films about courageous women in a work environment, both of which ended up on AFI’s Most Inspirational Films list. 1983’s “Silkwood” came in at #66 (Karen Silkwood was also named one of the Greatest Heroes by AFI), and 1988’s “Working Girl” landed at #87. In 2001, he directed the TV movie, “Wit,” which earned him his first Emmy, completing the Slam. In 2003, he signed on to direct four of the six episodes of HBO’s groundbreaking mini-series, “Angels in America,” earning two more Emmys.
Noteworthy Films: Who’s Afraid of Virginia Woolf, The Graduate, Catch-22, Silkwood, Biloxi Blues, Working Girl, Postcards from the Edge, Wolf, The Birdcage, Primary Colors, Wit, Angels in America, Closer
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PostSubject: Re: The 100 Greatest Directors of All-Time   Sun Nov 22, 2009 9:42 am

whammon
Posted: Mon Oct 08, 2007 8:19 pm

66. Fred Zinneman
Originally training to be a lawyer in Vienna, Fred Zinneman changed ambitions and became one of the most prolific and honored directors of his time. After abandoning his law ambitions, he began training as a cinematographer in Paris, starting in 1927. He made his directorial debut in 1930 with “People on Sunday,” a semi-documentary about post-Hitler Germany. He continued directing short films and docudramas for the better part of the next two decades. Among his efforts, “That Mothers Might Live,” won the Oscar for Best Live Action Short in 1938. He earned his first individual nomination in 1948 for “The Search,” about an American soldier who helps a Czech boy find his mother in post-war Europe. Zinneman was nominated for Best Director, and the film won for its screenplay. Three years later, Zinneman took home his first of four Oscars for Best Short Subject Documentary for “Benjy.” Never confined to just one genre, Zinneman earned Oscar nominations for a western (“High Noon”), a drama (“The Nun’s Story”), an adventure (“The Sundowners”), and a melodrama (“Julia”). He would also win in three other genres, war and romance (“From Here to Eternity” Best Director), and biography (“A Man for All Seasons,” Best Director and Best Picture). Throw in a musical comedy “Oklahoma!” and Fred Zinneman officially runs the gamut of nearly every film genre, succeeding with audiences, critic, and the Academy, in all.
Noteworthy Films: That Mothers Might Live, The Search, Benjy, Teresa, High Noon, The Member of the Wedding, From Here to Eternity, Oklahoma!, The Nun’s Story, The Sundowners, A Man for All Seasons, Julia, Five Days One Summer
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PostSubject: Re: The 100 Greatest Directors of All-Time   Sun Nov 22, 2009 9:43 am

whammon
Posted: Tue Oct 09, 2007 11:17 pm

65. Stanley Kramer
Nominated for nine Oscars in his illustrious career as a producer and director, Stanley Kramer was at the helm of two of the most important films in American history with regard to racial issues. His directorial career began with “Not as a Stranger,” which was nominated for an Oscar for Sound in 1955. Three years later, he directed “The Defiant Ones,” a groundbreaking drama about two convicts, one black and one white, who escape chained together, and have to learn to get along in order to survive. The film won Oscars for Cinematography and Writing, and Kramer was nominated for Directing and Best Picture. The film’s principals, Sidney Poitier and Tony Curtis were both nominated for Best Actor. In 1960, he tackled another controversial drama, “Inherit the Wind,” based on the play of the same name, which centers around the Scopes Monkey Trial of 1925, bringing the evolution/creationism debate to the forefront of American culture. In 1961, he continued his brand of hard-hitting emotional drama with “Judgment at Nuremberg.” Kramer was again nominated for Directing and Best Picture, and was given the Irving G. Thalberg Award. The film itself won two Oscars, Best Actor Maximilian Schell, and Adapted Screenplay. Despite his penchant for dramatic fare, his follow-up to “Nuremberg” was the side-splitting ensemble comedy, “It’s a Mad Mad Mad Mad World.” Using nearly every comedic actor working in Hollywood at the time (everyone from Jonathan Winters to the Three Stooges in a cameo), the film became a massive success, and remains a comedy classic to this day (ranked #40 on AFI’s Comedy List). The film also broke technological ground, as it was the first film shot in Cinerama to use an anamorphic lens. In 1967, Kramer gathered his three favorite actors, Sidney Poitier, Katherine Hepburn (after whom he named his first child), and Spencer Tracy, in what would be his final performance, to make what is arguably the most important social film in history, “Guess Who’s Coming to Dinner.” Kramer was again nominated for Directing and Best Picture, while Katherine Hepburn took Best Actress, and the film’s Original Screenplay took home honors. In the film, the highly taboo (and in some states, still illegal) issue of interracial marriage was tackled. Yet, in a brilliant turn of the characters and story, the biggest objections about the union come from black people (Tillie the housekeeper and Prentice’s (Poitier) father). Poitier’s character was intentionally built to an ideological standard that made him so likeable, that the only possible objections to the union would be his race, or the fact that the relationship had only begun nine days previous. The film remains a relevant classic, as the issue is still considered something of a taboo today, though not nearly as strong. AFI recognized the importance of the film when it was named as one of the Greatest Films of the Last 100 Years (ranked #99). After this triumph, Kramer’s career died down. Until his death in 2001, most of his directorial efforts were television movies and documentaries, including a 1975 adaptation of “Guess Who’s Coming to Dinner.” Since his death, some of his work has been since tarnished by hackneyed remakes (“Rat Race” in 2001 and “Guess Who” in 2005), but thankfully, audiences have avoided them, choosing instead the classics that Kramer imagined.
Noteworthy Films: Not as a Stranger, The Defiant Ones, On the Beach, Inherit the Wind, Judgment at Nuremberg, It’s a Mad Mad Mad Mad World, Ship of Fools, Guess Who’s Coming to Dinner
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PostSubject: Re: The 100 Greatest Directors of All-Time   Sun Nov 22, 2009 9:44 am

lasvegasguy
Posted: Wed Oct 10, 2007 2:44 am

whammon wrote:
67. Mike Nichols
With a career spanning more than 40 years, Nichols is in a very exclusive club. Along with the likes of Rita Moreno and Mel Brooks, Nichols is one of only nine people to earn the career “Grand Slam” on the awards circuit, winning an Oscar, an Emmy, a Grammy, and a Tony. Emigrating from Berlin in 1939, Nichols had a successful stage career, forming what would become the “Second City Improv” company. He earned his Grammy in 1961 for Best Comedy Album. As a stage director, he won seven Tonys, the first as Best Director for “Barefoot in the Park” in 1964. His film career began in 1966 with “Who’s Afraid of Virginia Woolf?” A year later, he nabbed his Oscar as Best Director for “The Graduate.” In 1970, he directed “Catch-22,” which was significant because he was the first director to ever receive a $1 million salary. In the 80s, he directed two films about courageous women in a work environment, both of which ended up on AFI’s Most Inspirational Films list. 1983’s “Silkwood” came in at #66 (Karen Silkwood was also named one of the Greatest Heroes by AFI), and 1988’s “Working Girl” landed at #87. In 2001, he directed the TV movie, “Wit,” which earned him his first Emmy, completing the Slam. In 2003, he signed on to direct four of the six episodes of HBO’s groundbreaking mini-series, “Angels in America,” earning two more Emmys.
Noteworthy Films: Who’s Afraid of Virginia Woolf, The Graduate, Catch-22, Silkwood, Biloxi Blues, Working Girl, Postcards from the Edge, Wolf, The Birdcage, Primary Colors, Wit, Angels in America, Closer

Shocked Shocked Shocked

67 out of 100??!!!! This is getting interesting.
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PostSubject: Re: The 100 Greatest Directors of All-Time   Sun Nov 22, 2009 9:45 am

whammon
Posted: Wed Oct 10, 2007 2:49 pm

64. David Lynch
The best words to describe his work as a writer and director would probably be “homey” and “eclectic.” Using his own experiences growing up in small town America, along with his art school experiences, which inspired his trademark use of bright, vibrant colors, Lynch’s first feature length film was 1977’s “Eraserhead.” The film was hit and miss with critics, but other directors loved his style, and the film has since gained a strong cult following. The Hollywood admiration he drew from of all people, Mel Brooks, led to him taking the reigns of 1980’s “The Elephant Man,” his first mainstream film. The film earned eight Oscar nominations, including two for Lynch (Directing and Adapted Screenplay). His next film, on the other hand, was a catastrophic failure. “Dune” is one of those films used as a reference when referring to bad movies in general, much like “Ishtar.” Lynch was able to redeem himself in spades with his follow-up, 1986’s “Blue Velvet,” which earned him another Best Director nomination. In 1990, he directed the ultraviolent “Wild at Heart,” earning him the Golden Palm at Cannes. He then took a break from movies to create, write, and produce the television series, “Twin Peaks,” which was an audience favorite for its torrid surrealism. ABC abruptly cancelled the show after two seasons, despite the audience favor, so Lynch made a movie for the fans, 1992’s “Twin Peaks: Fire Walk With Me,” which earned him another Golden Palm nomination. He’d be nominated for Cannes’ highest honor two more times, for 1999’s “The Straight Story,” and 2001’s “Mulholland Dr.” for which he’d also tie Joel Coen for the Best Director Prize. Another idiosyncratic cult hit, “Mulholland Dr.” was a critical success, earning Lynch his third Best Director Oscar nomination.
Noteworthy Films: Eraserhead, The Elephant Man, Dune, Blue Velvet, Wild at Heart, Twin Peaks: Fire Walk With Me, Lost Highway, The Straight Story, Mulholland Dr.
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PostSubject: Re: The 100 Greatest Directors of All-Time   Sun Nov 22, 2009 9:46 am

whammon
Posted: Thu Oct 11, 2007 9:06 pm

63. Joseph L. Mankiewicz
An Oscar-nominated writer and producer long before he ever helmed a film (nominated for Best Picture “The Philadelphia Story” in 1940 and Adapted Screenplay for “Skippy” in 1931), Joseph Mankiewicz still had great success in his own right as a director. Beginning his directorial career in 1946 with films like “Dragonwyck” and “Somewhere in the Night,” Mankiewicz carved himself a niche in film-noir and gothic romance, relying on character driven suspense and good writing (much of which he did himself). He earned two Oscars in 1949 for “A Letter to Three Wives,” for Writing and Directing. He’d repeat that success a year later, winning Oscars for Writing and Directing again, for “All About Eve.” Mankiewicz’s two Oscars were among six the film won, including Best Picture. It’s fourteen nominations still ranks as the most all-time, a record later tied by “Titanic” in 1997. The film is also one of the most recognized and honored by AFI, landing on four different lists (#16 on All-Time List, #28 on 10th Anniversary All-Time List, Eve Harrington ranked as #23 Villain, “Fasten your seatbelts, it’s going to be a bumpy night” ranked #9 on Quotes List). “All About Eve” was Mankiewicz’s masterpiece, and he’d never equal the success he had with it, although he did earn two more Best Director nominations for “5 Fingers” in 1952, and “Sleuth” in 1972, which turned out to be his final film as a director.
Noteworthy Films: Somewhere in the Night, The Ghost and Mrs. Muir, A Letter to Three Wives, No Way Out, All About Eve, 5 Fingers, Julius Caesar, Guys and Dolls, The Quiet American, Sleuth
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PostSubject: Re: The 100 Greatest Directors of All-Time   Sun Nov 22, 2009 9:47 am

Sassenach
Posted: Thu Oct 11, 2007 9:49 pm

You know, if you were really committed to this you'd make the movie titles hot links so we could check out the ones we weren't familiar with.





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PostSubject: Re: The 100 Greatest Directors of All-Time   Sun Nov 22, 2009 9:48 am

whammon
Posted: Thu Oct 11, 2007 9:56 pm

Sassenach wrote:
You know, if you were really committed to this you'd make the movie titles hot links so we could check out the ones we weren't familiar with.





Big Grin

Yeah, but I'm not
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PostSubject: Re: The 100 Greatest Directors of All-Time   Sun Nov 22, 2009 9:49 am

tamartin
Posted: Thu Oct 11, 2007 11:12 pm

whammon wrote:
82. Gus Van Sant
A darling of the arthouse, but also fairly successful with mainstream audiences, Gus Van Sant’s films can best be described as “unique.”

Have you ever actually seen Even Cowgirls Get the Blues?" It may well surpass Harley Davidson and the Marlboro Man and Exit to Eden as the worst film of the 90s.

Just out of curiosity, where are Hal Hartley, Werner Hertzog, Whit Stilman, Clint Eastwood, and Philip S. Kaufman on your list?

Also I can't believe you ranked Mel Gibson ahead of John Waters. Say what you want to about Waters, but he is much more significant than Gibson and has an actual moral center. Watch Pink Flamingos and The Passion side by side. With Pink Flamingos you actually get a pretty serious dialectic between breaking laws and taboos going throughout the film, while with Passion all you learn is that our Savior could take an asswhipping, Pontius Pilate was the most sensitive Roman Prefect ever, and that Jews are bad.
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PostSubject: Re: The 100 Greatest Directors of All-Time   Sun Nov 22, 2009 9:51 am

whammon
Posted: Thu Oct 11, 2007 11:23 pm

tamartin wrote:
whammon wrote:
82. Gus Van Sant
A darling of the arthouse, but also fairly successful with mainstream audiences, Gus Van Sant’s films can best be described as “unique.”

Have you ever actually seen Even Cowgirls Get the Blues?" It may well surpass Harley Davidson and the Marlboro Man and Exit to Eden as the worst film of the 90s.

Just out of curiosity, where are Hal Hartley, Werner Hertzog, Whit Stilman, Clint Eastwood, and Philip S. Kaufman on your list?

Also I can't believe you ranked Mel Gibson ahead of John Waters. Say what you want to about Waters, but he is much more significant than Gibson and has an actual moral center. Watch Pink Flamingos and The Passion side by side. With Pink Flamingos you actually get a pretty serious dialectic between breaking laws and taboos going throughout the film, while with Passion all you learn is that our Savior could take an asswhipping, Pontius Pilate was the most sensitive Roman Prefect ever, and that Jews are bad.
The reason I list films as "Noteworthy" is just for the reason you bring up "Cowgirls." It doesn't have to be good. It can be catastrophically bad and still be noteworthy.

Philip Kaufman is ranked at 77. As for the others, if they are on the list, they're coming up. Stay tuned.

As for Mel being higher than Waters, it has nothing to do with moral compass, that's a bit more subjective than I would like to go (although I probably fail in that regard spectacularly). The fact of the matter is, Gibson is a more significant filmmaker. The day John Waters makes a controversial film that still somehow grosses over $300 million worldwide, then I'll believe he's more significant than Mel. I don't agree with Mel's social and religious beliefs, and I'm one of the few who can take the religious intent OUT of that movie and look at it for what it is. Still, all things being equal, weighing their collective bodies of work, I find Gibson to be a better director, and a more significant filmmaker in regard to cinematic history.
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PostSubject: Re: The 100 Greatest Directors of All-Time   Sun Nov 22, 2009 9:51 am

tamartin
Posted: Thu Oct 11, 2007 11:51 pm

I would argue that the argument that John Waters is a lesser director than Mel Gibson is invalid because what a bunch of shitheads all decide to watch at once has nothing to do with how good a movie is. Otherwise Joel Schumacher is a fucking genius.

John Waters is kind of like the Velvet Underground of filmmakers, a lot of talented people who saw Waters' flicks went out and made ones of their own. Meanwhile the more savvy of Gibson's viewers went on to part the superstitious from their cash.
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PostSubject: Re: The 100 Greatest Directors of All-Time   Sun Nov 22, 2009 9:52 am

whammon
Posted: Fri Oct 12, 2007 2:56 am

You make a good point, but I would counter that not only are Waters' films not mainstream, he intends them not to be. He is going for a very fine niche of taboo and controversy, whereas Gibson can do the same thing without his films falling to a cult audience.

Still, the two are apples and oranges in the grand scheme of cinema. Think of it in this sense. I'm not trying to take anything away from Waters by ranking Mel higher. As far as I'm concerned, once this list is complete, you could make arguments to completely reshuffle 100-11, and a separate reshuffle of the top 10. And as I said at the outset, this is by no means definitive. I welcome the debate and input. But as far as the rankings go, especially for the back 50, it's all about who made the list, cause there were a bunch that didn't, and not just shitty hack artists like Michael Bay, good ones.
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PostSubject: Re: The 100 Greatest Directors of All-Time   Sun Nov 22, 2009 9:53 am

Redbob86
Posted: Fri Oct 12, 2007 2:58 am

Enough with the bitching, back to the countdown. popcorn
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PostSubject: Re: The 100 Greatest Directors of All-Time   Sun Nov 22, 2009 9:54 am

tamartin
Posted: Fri Oct 12, 2007 9:26 am

Redbob86 wrote:
Enough with the bitching, back to the countdown. popcorn

To say that misses the point of the countdown if not all electronic communication.

Kevin Smith wrote:
The internet is a communications tool used the world over, where people can come together to bitch about movies and share pornography with one another.
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