http://outlawstoughcrowd.niceboards.net/index.htmhttp://outlawstoughcrowd.niceboards.net/index.htm

HomeHome  FAQFAQ  SearchSearch  RegisterRegister  Log in  

Share | 
 

 The 100 Greatest Directors of All-Time

View previous topic View next topic Go down 
Go to page : Previous  1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6  Next
AuthorMessage
...



Posts : 1137
Join date : 2008-11-15

PostSubject: Re: The 100 Greatest Directors of All-Time   Sun Nov 22, 2009 9:55 am

Redbob86
Posted: Fri Oct 12, 2007 9:34 am

Yeah, maybe if this was the top 20, or at the very least the top 50. But fighting for 82nd place seems completely pointless with little to gain.
Back to top Go down
...



Posts : 1137
Join date : 2008-11-15

PostSubject: Re: The 100 Greatest Directors of All-Time   Sun Nov 22, 2009 9:56 am

whammon
Posted: Fri Oct 12, 2007 2:04 pm

tamartin wrote:
Redbob86 wrote:
Enough with the bitching, back to the countdown. popcorn

To say that misses the point of the countdown if not all electronic communication.

Kevin Smith wrote:
The internet is a communications tool used the world over, where people can come together to bitch about movies and share pornography with one another.

The Internet has given everyone in the world a voice, and apparently everyone has chosen to use that voice to bitch about movies.
Back to top Go down
...



Posts : 1137
Join date : 2008-11-15

PostSubject: Re: The 100 Greatest Directors of All-Time   Sun Nov 22, 2009 9:57 am

lasvegasguy
Posted: Fri Oct 12, 2007 3:37 pm

whammon wrote:
tamartin wrote:
Redbob86 wrote:
Enough with the bitching, back to the countdown. popcorn

To say that misses the point of the countdown if not all electronic communication.

Kevin Smith wrote:
The internet is a communications tool used the world over, where people can come together to bitch about movies and share pornography with one another.

The Internet has given everyone in the world a voice, and apparently everyone has chosen to use that voice to bitch about movies.

Not everyone. Steve uses it to watch midget porn. Wink
Back to top Go down
...



Posts : 1137
Join date : 2008-11-15

PostSubject: Re: The 100 Greatest Directors of All-Time   Sun Nov 22, 2009 9:58 am

whammon
Posted: Sat Oct 13, 2007 5:03 pm

Double dose cause I didn't have time yesterday. Also, just so's ya know, I will be giving you guys a double shot next Friday and and a triple shot next Saturday, to finish the back 50. That is because I will be exceedingly busy next Sunday, and after that, I will be on a pseudo vacation until Halloween. I say pseudo because although I will be off for nine days (two weekends on my schedule plus a week off work), I won't be going on a massive trip or anything. I'm just going home for my sister's wedding. While there I'll be even busier, helping with the last minute preparations, writing my toast, and of course, bachelor party. So, long story short, my computer time will be extremely limited. So I'm gonna get the back 50 done for you before I go, and you can enjoy it and wait with bated breath till I get back at the end of the month.

All that said, here's today's double shot.

62. Fritz Lang
One of the pioneers of European filmmaking, Lang is also a footnote in American history. Fighting for Austria in World War I, he was severely injured, and spent his recovery time writing scripts. After his release, he joined up with production companies in Berlin, working as a writer and director. The 1920’s saw his greatest successes in German silent films, with works such as “Dr. Mabuse, King of Crime” and “Siegfried’s Death.” In 1927, he directed the quintessential early sci-fi movie, “Metropolis,” which has arguably done more with the special effects available at the time than any other movie to date. Ironically, despite the praise of film historians, the film itself was a commercial failure in Germany. Also, as the years have gone by, the film (what remains of it, anyway; portions of it are lost) has been restored and re-released several times. Funnily enough, in 1985, the score for that release was nominated for Razzie awards, and then in 2000, the new score for that re-release was given an Honorary Roger from the Avignon/New York Film Festival. In 1931, Lang directed his most successful German film, “M.” The film-noir remains a staple of the genre to this day. The success of “M,” along with the rest of Lang’s body of work in Germany, prompted an offer from Josef Goebbels, Hitler’s propaganda minister, to become the head of the German Cinema Institute in 1933. Being a Catholic with a Jewish-born mother, Lang was very much anti-Nazi. He turned down the position, which angered Hitler, who personally loved Lang’s films (the job would eventually go to Leni Riefenstahl), and within a year, funneled his money out of Germany and fled to Paris, and eventually, the United States. Lang would spend the next two decades directing films in America, the first being 1936’s “Fury,” which was nominated for an Oscar. During the second World War, Lang ended up doing the exact opposite of what Hitler wanted him for. Had he stayed in Germany and taken the job, he would have made pro-Nazi propaganda films. In America, he spent the war making anti-Nazi films like “Man Hunt,” “Hangmen Also Die!” and “Ministry of Fear.” Lang’s career flagged after the war was over. He found work increasingly hard to find due partly to his inability to work with actors. In the late 1950s, he returned to Germany, directing a few more films before near blindness forced him into retirement.
Noteworthy Films: Dr. Mabuse, King of Crime, Siegfried’s Death, Metropolis, Woman in the Moon, M, The Last Will of Dr. Mabuse, The Crimes of Dr. Mabuse, Liliom, Fury, Western Union, Man Hunt, The Big Heat, The Thousand Eyes of Dr. Mabuse

61. Carol Reed
One of many to make the transition from the stage to the screen, Reed’s career was all about climbing ladders. Beginning as a dialog director in 1932, he quickly rose up through the ranks of all the assistant directors until he finally got the reigns himself, for “Midshipmen Easy” in 1935. He’d continue climbing the ladder of British cinema, directing several B movies until 1940, when he helmed two ambitions projects, the working class drama “The Stars Look Down,” and the comic mystery, “Night Train to Munich,” which he openly admits was made as an homage/unlicensed sequel to Alfred Hitchcock’s “The Lady Vanishes.” 1946 brought his first great success, the post-war documentary “The True Glory,” which won the Oscar for Best Documentary (although originally, Garson Kanin was given full credit). In the late 40s, Reed would earn two Oscar nominations for Best Director, the first for “The Fallen Idol” in 1948, and a year later for “The Third Man” in 1949. Although “The Third Man” was his greatest success to date, the film was contrary to his style of directing. Reed saw the process as collaborative, that the whole crew was a team, and the director merely a coordinator. Enter Orson Welles, who, needing money to finance his own films, agreed to play the part of the notorious Harry Lime (ranked #37 on AFI’s Villains List). Although Welles only has about ten minutes of screen time in the picture, he basically took over the production for his scenes, writing his own dialog, repositioning the camera and lighting for shots in the sewer chase scenes, etc. Reed let him carry on, and all of Welles’ footage was, ahem, conveniently lost before the final cut was assembled. Despite a career of directing film-noirs and dramas, Reed's ultimate success would come from, of all things, a musical. Having always worked well with children, he directed “Oliver!” in 1968. The film was nominated for eleven Oscars, winning five, including Best Picture, and Reed’s first and only Best Director.
Noteworthy Films: Midshipmen Easy, The Stars Look Down, Night Train to Munich, Kipps, The Young Mr. Pitt, The True Glory, Odd Man Out, The Fallen Idol, The Third Man, The Agony and the Ecstasy, Oliver!
Back to top Go down
...



Posts : 1137
Join date : 2008-11-15

PostSubject: Re: The 100 Greatest Directors of All-Time   Sun Nov 22, 2009 9:59 am

whammon
Posted: Tue Oct 16, 2007 2:15 am

Triple shot:

60. Michael Mann
One of the frontrunners of American crime drama, Michael Mann, like David Lynch, has had massive success in both TV and film. He won an Emmy for his first effort, the TV movie, “The Jericho Mile,” in 1979. He made his cinematic debut in 1981 with “Thief,” which was nominated for the Golden Palm at Cannes. In 1984, he hit paydirt with television audiences as creator of “Miami Vice.” The show would win two Emmys during its run, and in 2006, Mann would direct a film version of the show. In 1986, Mann was at the helm of “Manhunter,” the first story of Hannibal Lector (remade as “Red Dragon”). In 1992 he made a full transition to film with “Last of the Mohicans,” a critical and commercial success. Often depicting criminals and fugitives in a sympathetic light, Mann was at the center of one of the most significant crime dramas in film history. In 1995, “Heat” made history, as the first film ever to have legendary actors Robert De Niro and Al Pacino in a scene together (both appeared in “The Godfather, Part II, but as De Niro’s scenes were flashbacks, they never appeared in the same frame). In 1999, he directed Pacino again in “The Insider,” earning Mann three Oscar nominations (Best Director, Adapted Screenplay and Best Picture) amongst the film’s seven. The film also forged a second genre niche for Mann, biographical pictures. He’d continue that success in 2001 with his biopic “Ali,” which earned Will Smith his first Oscar nomination. 2004 brought two hits of Oscar recognition for Mann. He directed “Collateral,” which earned two nominations, and he co-produced Martin Scorsese’s biopic of Howard Hughes, “The Aviator,” earning him his second Best Picture nomination.
Noteworthy Films: The Jericho Mile, Thief, The Keep, Manhunter, The Last of the Mohicans, Heat, The Insider, Ali, Collateral

59. Wolfgang Petersen
Although much of his critical and awards circuit success has come from one movie in his native Germany, Wolfgang Petersen has also had success on this side of the proverbial pond, directing films that have won praise from audiences young and old. After more than fifteen years of directing television and movies in Germany, Petersen hit the big time in 1981 with one of the best known foreign films in history, “Das Boot.” Nominated for six Oscars (Petersen twice as Best Director and Adapted Screenplay), but ironically not Foreign Language Film, “Das Boot” is one of the most memorable war films of all time, depicting the terror and claustrophobia German sailors endured inside a World War II U-boat. The success of the film got Hollywood’s attention, and in 1984, he directed what may be the ultimate fantasy film of the 80s, “The Neverending Story.” Earning a Saturn award, the film’s increasingly dark story worked on several levels for adults and children, and although it eventually spawned a lackluster sequel (which Petersen was not involved with), the film remains a standard of fantasy fare (side note: one of my favorite bands is named after one of the characters). Sticking to sci-fi, Petersen followed with “Enemy Mine,” which earned him two awards at the Avoriaz Fantastic Film Festival. 1993 gave us “In the Line of Fire,” starring Clint Eastwood as an aging Secret Service agent trying to prevent an assassination attempt on the President. The film earned three Oscar nominations, including a Supporting Actor nod to John Malkovich. In 1995, he helmed the oft referenced sci-fi action thriller, “Outbreak.” With an all-star cast and action sequences that are way over the top, the film still remains the first thing we think of when someone mentions a diseased monkey.
Noteworthy Films: Das Boot, The Neverending Story, Enemy Mine, Shattered, In the Line of Fire, Outbreak, Air Force One, The Perfect Storm, Troy

58. John Cassavetes
One of only five people to earn Oscar nominations as a writer, director and actor, John Cassavetes was a pioneer of cinema verité. Beginning his career as an actor in the early 1950s (he earned a Best Supporting Actor nomination for “The Dirty Dozen” in 1967), Cassavetes made his directorial debut in 1959 with “Shadows,” which won the BAFTA award for “Best Film from any Source.” 1968’s “Faces” earned him his Screenwriting Oscar nomination, as well as nods from the Writers Guild of America and the Venice Film Festival. Always preferring a documentary approach to his films, he had his greatest directorial success with “A Woman Under the Influence” in 1974, earning him a Best Director nomination. In 1980, Cassavetes won the Golden Lion at the Venice Film Festival for “Gloria,” the festival’s highest honor. Completing his international success, 1984’s “Love Streams” won the Golden Bear at the Berlin International Film Festival, as well as FIPRESCI Competition Prize.
Noteworthy Films: Shadows, Faces, Husbands, Minnie and Moskowitz, A Woman Under the Influence, Opening Night, Gloria, Love Streams
Back to top Go down
...



Posts : 1137
Join date : 2008-11-15

PostSubject: Re: The 100 Greatest Directors of All-Time   Sun Nov 22, 2009 10:00 am

jbcoops
Posted: Tue Oct 16, 2007 12:03 pm

Where's Ed Wood? I mean... aside from being 6 feet under.
Back to top Go down
...



Posts : 1137
Join date : 2008-11-15

PostSubject: Re: The 100 Greatest Directors of All-Time   Sun Nov 22, 2009 10:00 am

whammon
Posted: Tue Oct 16, 2007 2:58 pm

My sister and her fiance a couple of weeks ago told me they finally saw a movie WORSE that "Planet 9 From Outer Space." That film being "Dragon Wars."

That answer your question.
Back to top Go down
...



Posts : 1137
Join date : 2008-11-15

PostSubject: Re: The 100 Greatest Directors of All-Time   Sun Nov 22, 2009 10:01 am

whammon
Posted: Wed Oct 17, 2007 3:56 pm

57. Peter Jackson
Always interested in a combination of special effects and low budget, Peter Jackson’s first foray into effects was as a child, poking holes in the celluloid of his 8MM camera while making a short war movie. The holes, once projected, made for a decent simulation of bullet streaks coming from a small machine gun. Ever the perfectionist, even with small projects amongst friends, his first fully assembled film was a four year effort, culminating in 1987 with “Bad Taste.” The film became a cult classic, due to its abundance of special effects, while still maintaining a very amateuristic look. The film was eventually shown at Cannes. After its success, Jackson was given professional opportunities in horror, beginning with “Braindead” in 1992. Two years later he earned his first Oscar nomination, for Original Screenplay for “Heavenly Creatures.” He continued directing horror films through the end of the 90s, all of them featuring commonalities such as bloodbaths, axes, and matricide. The new millennium brought with it the “Lord of the Rings” trilogy, which catapulted Jackson from cult hero to one of the most powerful directors in the world. Amazingly ambitious, the entire trilogy was filmed over the course of 18 months in New Zealand, with each film getting a year of post-production attention prior to its release. Using some of the most advanced visual and makeup effects ever seen, the films were massive successes, earning Jackson a combined $150 million by himself. Each film earned Oscar praise, including Best Picture nominations for all three, and each film took home awards. The third film, however, “The Return of the King,” got the most. Many believe it was more the trilogy being honored rather than just the final film, but still, “The Return of the King,” swept the Oscars, winning every category in which it was nominated, making it only the third film to do so (the other two being “The Last Emperor” in 1987 and “Gigi” in 1958). Peter Jackson won the “Triple Crown,” of awards, capturing Best Director, Best Picture, and Best Screenplay (Adapted). He’s the first person to do that since James L. Brooks did it in 1983 for “Terms of Endearment,” and only the fifth director overall (including Leo McCary, ranked #92 on this list). Finally, the film is only the second sequel to ever win Best Picture (the other being “The Godfather, Part II” in 1974) and is the only “part three” to earn Oscar’s highest prize. With the influence he earned from the trilogy, Jackson took on a more personal project. Often saying that “King Kong” was the film that inspired him to be a filmmaker, he helmed a rather ambitious remake of the film. Three hours long, and using even more innovative special effects, the homage film became a hit with audiences and earned a few technical Oscar nods.
Noteworthy Films: Bad Taste, Meet the Feebles, Braindead, Heavenly Creatures, The Frighteners, The Lord of the Rings: The Fellowship of the Ring, The Lord of the Rings: The Two Towers, The Lord of the Rings: The Return of the King, King Kong
Back to top Go down
...



Posts : 1137
Join date : 2008-11-15

PostSubject: Re: The 100 Greatest Directors of All-Time   Sun Nov 22, 2009 10:02 am

Redbob86
Posted: Wed Oct 17, 2007 4:45 pm

Why did he have to bail on the Halo movie? Sad
Back to top Go down
...



Posts : 1137
Join date : 2008-11-15

PostSubject: Re: The 100 Greatest Directors of All-Time   Sun Nov 22, 2009 10:03 am

tamartin
Posted: Wed Oct 17, 2007 10:13 pm

My understanding was that Jackson wanted a huge budget to make it, and the studio took one look at the numbers and freaked.

Although in Jackson's defense, while expensive LotR and King Kong did make a gracious buttload of money.
Back to top Go down
...



Posts : 1137
Join date : 2008-11-15

PostSubject: Re: The 100 Greatest Directors of All-Time   Sun Nov 22, 2009 10:03 am

Redbob86
Posted: Thu Oct 18, 2007 1:24 am

There is talk about the film going off it's hiatus, but Jackson is somewhat taking a break from films and focusing on the gaming industry with his new gaming company, "Wingnut Entertainment".

If anyone else attempted to make the Halo movie, it would probably be awful, as videogame movies tend to be, largely due to Hollywood not taking them seriously and only seeing them as ways to get money from fans.
Back to top Go down
...



Posts : 1137
Join date : 2008-11-15

PostSubject: Re: The 100 Greatest Directors of All-Time   Sun Nov 22, 2009 10:04 am

whammon
Posted: Thu Oct 18, 2007 3:35 pm

Daily Doubles to finish up the back 50.

56. Joel Coen
Working as a team with his brother, Ethan, Joel Coen has made some of the oddest films of the last 30 years. Sharing writing and editing duties with Ethan, Joel has always been the principal director of the tandem, while Ethan has been mainly the producer. Always operating outside of mainstream Hollywood, his first film, “Blood Simple,” earned him an Independent Spirit Award for Best Director, ranked #98 on AFI’s thrillers list, and won the Grand Jury Prize at Sundance. The follow-up, 1987’s “Raising Arizona,” was ranked #31 on AFI’s comedy list. In 1996, the brothers released “Fargo,” their greatest commercial and critical success to date. Earning places on three AFI lists (#84 All Time, #93 Comedy, Marge Gunderson #33 Hero), the film won two Oscars, including a Screenplay award for the brothers. Joel was nominated for Best Director. The next year, the brothers Coen came out with “The Big Lewbowski,” quite possibly the greatest cult comedy of all time. In 2000, “O Brother, Where Art Thou?” became a hit with critics and the awards circuit, earning two Oscar nominations, for Cinematography and Adapted Screenplay (loosely based on Homer’s “Odyssey”). Coen has a lot of commonalities in his films. He uses a relatively small pool of the same actors (John Goodman, Steve Buscemi, George Clooney, etc), the comedy is usually very dark, and oftentimes crime is romanticized. Still, the brothers have certainly found their niche in the business, and while their movies rarely rake in the dough for studios, they have a very loyal fan base.
Noteworthy Films: Blood Simple, Raising Arizona, Miller’s Crossing, Barton Fink, The Hudsucker Proxy, Fargo, The Big Lewbowski, O Brother, Where Art Thou?, The Man Who Wasn’t There, No Country for Old Men

55. Tim Burton
Relying heavily on compelling characters and abstract art for his scenery, many of Tim Burton’s films give the term “dark comedy” a whole new meaning. Whereas it usually means macabre humor, Burton oftentimes juxtaposes the term to make light of things that many would find abstract, surreal, or morbid, like death, dismemberment, the afterlife, etc. Beginning his career in the 1980s directing B movies, he didn’t get his hands on a major project until 1985, when he helmed “Pee-Wee’s Big Adventure.” Paul Ruebens’ style of comedy and oddball character of Pee-Wee Herman actually proved to be the perfect outlet for Burton’s quirky brand of directing. After that, he started getting even bigger projects, noteably “Beetle Juice” in 1988 and “Batman” in 1989. With these two films, he was able to let his dark side come out, and portray a very surreal style when it came to set design, character development, and overall humor. In 1990, he directed his first major film with Johnny Depp (who he would use many times afterward), “Edward Scissorhands.” The film itself is eerily beautiful, as is Depp’s character, which was sort of the point. Scissorhands was a modern-day Frankenstein or King Kong, a monster if you judged simply by his look, but with a kind, gentle soul. Burton turned around and followed-up with “Batman Returns,” the last film he would do of the series, along with Michael Keaton. In 1993, he produced, but did not direct, one of the more famous animated films of recent memory, “The Nightmare Before Christmas.” While he did not direct the film, he was very hands on in the process, and his style is evident all over the innovative stop-motion animation. The film was a hit with audiences, and for the last three years running, the film has been re-released every year at Halloween in IMAX 3D. In 1994, Burton directed Depp again, this time in a biopic about one of the few directors in history quirkier than him, “Ed Wood.” The film had mixed reviews, partly because the film was shot in black and white, rarely done in the 1990s outside of the arthouse. The film won two Oscars, for Makeup and Supporting Actor Martin Landau. In 2001 Burton met Helena Bonham Carter. The two are now engaged, have a child, and are expecting another. Carter has appeared in each of Burton’s films since their engagement. Like Guy Ritchie, Burton takes a risk mixing business with pleasure, but unlike Ritchie, he at least is romantically involved with, and employing, an actual actress. It was Carter, also, who shed some light into a possible source for Burton’s oddball style. In an interview with Jonathan Ross, she suggested that Burton may have Asberger’s Syndrome, a mild form of autism which causes odd behavioral “ticks” amongst patients, similar to Tourette’s Syndrome. Still, despite that, she claims that the Asberger’s allowed his imagination to thrive, giving us the talented filmmaker we enjoy today. In 2005, Burton finally earned his first Oscar nomination, for Best Animated Feature, for his second stop-motion effort, “Corpse Bride,” with, you guessed it, Johnny Depp and Carter in the lead roles.
Noteworthy Films: Pee-Wee’s Big Adventure, Beetle Juice, Batman, Edward Scissorhands, Batman Returns, Ed Wood, Mars Attacks!, Sleepy Hollow, Big Fish, Charlie and the Chocolate Factory, Corpse Bride, Sweeny Todd: The Demon Barber of Fleet Street
Back to top Go down
...



Posts : 1137
Join date : 2008-11-15

PostSubject: Re: The 100 Greatest Directors of All-Time   Sun Nov 22, 2009 10:05 am

The Spleen
Posted: Fri Oct 19, 2007 1:41 pm

well thought out list.
Back to top Go down
...



Posts : 1137
Join date : 2008-11-15

PostSubject: Re: The 100 Greatest Directors of All-Time   Sun Nov 22, 2009 10:05 am

narrator
Posted: Fri Oct 19, 2007 2:04 pm

Tim Burton not in the Top 50? I thought for sure he'd make the Top Ten!
Back to top Go down
...



Posts : 1137
Join date : 2008-11-15

PostSubject: Re: The 100 Greatest Directors of All-Time   Sun Nov 22, 2009 10:06 am

Redbob86
Posted: Fri Oct 19, 2007 4:30 pm

narrator wrote:
Tim Burton not in the Top 50? I thought for sure he'd make the Top Ten!

Same here.
Back to top Go down
...



Posts : 1137
Join date : 2008-11-15

PostSubject: Re: The 100 Greatest Directors of All-Time   Sun Nov 22, 2009 10:06 am

whammon
Posted: Fri Oct 19, 2007 9:57 pm

Believe me, it was a hard choice. Even I couldn't believe I put him that low, but when I looked at the rest of my list, it made sense.

BTW, whoever can correctly guess the top 10 will win a cookie.
Back to top Go down
...



Posts : 1137
Join date : 2008-11-15

PostSubject: Re: The 100 Greatest Directors of All-Time   Sun Nov 22, 2009 10:07 am

Redbob86
Posted: Fri Oct 19, 2007 10:59 pm

whammon wrote:
Believe me, it was a hard choice. Even I couldn't believe I put him that low, but when I looked at the rest of my list, it made sense.

BTW, whoever can correctly guess the top 10 will win a cookie.

What if we just get a few of them right, can I still get a cookie?
Back to top Go down
...



Posts : 1137
Join date : 2008-11-15

PostSubject: Re: The 100 Greatest Directors of All-Time   Sun Nov 22, 2009 10:11 am

whammon
Posted: Sat Oct 20, 2007 12:16 am

How about this:

If you can guess the top ten, in any order, by the time I hit the top 20, you get the cookie. Once I hit the top 10, you can take a "second chance" guess, but you have to get all 10, in order.

Then, you will have a cookie.
Back to top Go down
...



Posts : 1137
Join date : 2008-11-15

PostSubject: Re: The 100 Greatest Directors of All-Time   Sun Nov 22, 2009 10:12 am

lasvegasguy
Posted: Sat Oct 20, 2007 6:22 pm

Is Jim Jarmish going to be on this list?
Back to top Go down
...



Posts : 1137
Join date : 2008-11-15

PostSubject: Re: The 100 Greatest Directors of All-Time   Sun Nov 22, 2009 10:13 am

whammon
Posted: Sat Oct 20, 2007 6:22 pm

Ladies and Gentlemen (and you, Bob), the Final Four (of the back 50):

54. Andrei Tarkovsky
While Sergei Eisenstein might have been the father of Russian cinema, Tarkovsky was the true master. His first feature film, “The Childhood of Ivan,” was a hit in his homeland, and won the top prize at the Venice Film Festival. The film, about a small boy who could sneak information across war lines without being seen, displayed a stark realism rarely seen even today. His follow-up, “Andrei Rublyov,” was highly anticipated, but ended up being banned by the Soviet government. The film was secretly screened in the last possible time slot at the Cannes Film Festival, with the intent of getting it shown, but not winning any prizes. It still won the FIPRESCI prize anyway. This began two major patterns of Tarkovsky’s career: Problems with Soviet censorship, and success at Cannes. In 1973, he directed “Solyaris” which many compare to Stanley Kubrick’s “2001: A Space Odyssey.” It was Tarkovsky’s most successful film, though Tarkovsky himself said it was his least favorite project. Still, it won two prizes at Cannes and was nominated for the Golden Palm. 1979’s “Stalker” had to be completely re-shot after a lab accident destroyed the original film. Even so, the Cannes favorite still won the Grand Prize of the Ecumenical Jury. Working with Italian officials, he directed “Nostalghia” in 1983, another multi-prize winner at Cannes, and officially defected to the west. He directed one more film before his death, “Offret” in 1986. Again, he earned three prizes at Cannes, for a total of ten over his career, although he never won the highest prize, the Golden Palm.
Noteworthy Films: The Childhood of Ivan, Andrei Rublyov, Solyaris, Zerkalo, Stalker, Nostalghia, Offret

53. John Carpenter
One of the true masters of horror and suspense, John Carpenter is responsible for one of the greatest horror villains of all time. Beginning his career writing and directing short films, including the Oscar-winning short, “The Resurrection of Broncho Billy,” Carpenter used his love of old Westerns as a constant element in his films. His first feature success, “Assault on Precinct 13,” remains a cult hit to this day, and includes many of the Western themes he grew up admiring. In fact, the film itself has several references to the Howard Hawks classic, “Rio Bravo.” 1978 saw his biggest success, and the beginning of a horror franchise still in existence today. Originally intended to be a standard B horror movie about a bunch of babysitters getting killed on Halloween night, “Halloween” turned into one of the greatest horror films of all time. Very low budget, the rubber mask worn by Michael Meyers was just a costume mask of Captain Kirk bought at a novelty shop for a few dollars. Carpenter would later say that he owes his entire career to William Shatner. The film is the ultimate in stalking terror, and despite the body count, there is very little actual gore. The creepiness of the film starts immediately, with the eerie synthesizer theme composed by Carpenter. Oddly enough, the film also works from a feminist standpoint, given the strength of will and selfless nature of Jamie Lee Curtis’s character. To say that “Halloween” is a horror standard would be to sell it short. It is one of the enduring classics of horror, and unlike some other horror franchises, is still legitimately scary to this day. In 1981, Carpenter directed “Escape from New York,” again modernizing old Western themes, this time in a post-apocalyptic type setting. This also began a longtime collaboration with actor Kurt Russell. Oddly enough, the cult classic would also be the only film in which Carpenter himself directed the sequel, 1996’s “Escape from L.A.” Many of Carpenters films (“Assault on Precinct 13” and “The Fog” in 2005, “Halloween” in 2007) have since been remade, with mixed reviews, except for “The Fog,” which was not screened for critics. The only “reviews” were from magazines and TV shows owned by the parent company, and therefore ordered to praise the film. Carpenter remains busy today, and is still at the forefront of American horror.
Noteworthy Films: Dark Star, Assault on Precinct 13, Halloween, The Fog, Escape from New York, The Thing, Christine, Prince of Darkness, Village of the Damned, Escape from L.A.

52. Sam Wood
With over 80 directorial credits to his name, Sam Wood was one of the most prolific directors, not just of the silent era, but of all time. He had his greatest successes, however, when talkies came into prominence. His first hits were two classic Marx Brothers comedies, “A Night at the Opera” and “A Day at the Races.” In 1939, he earned his first Oscar nomination, as Best Director for “Goodbye Mr. Chips.” That same year, he co-directed with Victor Fleming on one of the most beloved films of all time, “Gone With the Wind.” Wood was not initially credited for his work, but has been recognized in recent years. In 1940, he directed an adaptation of “Our Town,” earning high praise from audiences and critics. That same year, he would earn his second Oscar nod for “Kitty Foyle: The Natural History of a Woman.” Two years later, he would earn his final nomination, as director of “Kings Row.” Ironically, his nomination for “Kings Row,” in essence left him out of the Oscar spotlight, as his greatest work was done in the same year. “The Pride of the Yankees,” still enduring today as one of the most inspirational films of all time, earned ten Oscar nominations, including Gary Cooper’s portrayal of Lou Gehrig. Wood would direct nine more films before his death in 1949, including his last great work, “For Whom the Bell Tolls,” in 1943. Today, Wood’s achievements are honored with a star on Hollywood’s Walk of Fame.
Noteworthy Films: A Night at the Opera, A Day at the Races, Goodbye Mr. Chips, Gone With the Wind, Our Town, Kitty Foyle: The Natural History of a Woman, The Devil and Miss Jones, Kings Row, The Pride of the Yankees, For Whom the Bell Tolls

51. Garry Marshall
One of the busiest men in Hollywood, it’s pretty safe to say that Garry Marshall knows funny. Beginning in television, where he produced classic shows like “The Odd Couple,” “Happy Days,” “Mork and Mindy,” and “Laverne and Shirley,” Marshall made the transition to film in the 1980s. As a film director, he has had great success making romantic comedies and “chick flicks,” starting with “Beaches” in 1988. 1990 saw his greatest commercial success with “Pretty Woman.” The film made Julia Roberts and A-List star (she earned a Best Actress nomination), and solidified Richard Gere as a leading man. He has since repeated his success by combining Gere and Roberts again in 1999’s “Runaway Bride.” Marshall has rarely been taken seriously as a director, with the exception of “The Other Sister,” also released in 1999. A departure from the cutesy love stories he had directed before and since, he took a step back and applied his story skills to mentally handicapped characters. The film earned a Young Artists nomination for Best Family Comedy. Since the turn of the century, Marshall has continued his trend of directing modern day fairy tales featuring women in prominence, including the “Princess Diaries” series and most recently, “Georgia Rule.”
Noteworthy Films: Beaches, Pretty Woman, Frankie and Johnny, Exit to Eden, The Other Sister, Runaway Bride, The Princess Diaries, Raising Helen, Georgia Rule

Enjoy folks. I'll commence with the Top 50 after I get back from my pseudo-vacation on Halloween.
Back to top Go down
...



Posts : 1137
Join date : 2008-11-15

PostSubject: Re: The 100 Greatest Directors of All-Time   Sun Nov 22, 2009 10:13 am

tamartin
Posted: Sat Oct 20, 2007 9:40 pm

I'll take a swipe at it:

1. John Ford
2. D.W. Griffith
3. Charlie Chaplin
4. Elia Kazan
5. Federico Fellini
6. Akira Kurisawa
7. John Huston
8. Ingmar Bergman
9. Otto Von Stroeheim
10. Stanley Kubrick
Back to top Go down
...



Posts : 1137
Join date : 2008-11-15

PostSubject: Re: The 100 Greatest Directors of All-Time   Sun Nov 22, 2009 10:14 am

jbcoops
Posted: Sat Oct 20, 2007 10:18 pm

Good top ten there... I'd have to say that Orson Welles belongs there somewhere... and although Chaplin was a genius, Buster Keaton was a better director. Not sure if either one will make Whammon's Top 10 though.

Oh yeah... Wham... include "Dark Star" on John Carpenter's list. I think he did it as his masters thesis... dark comedy sci-fi... I loved it... others may disagree.
Back to top Go down
...



Posts : 1137
Join date : 2008-11-15

PostSubject: Re: The 100 Greatest Directors of All-Time   Sun Nov 22, 2009 10:14 am

Redbob86
Posted: Sat Oct 20, 2007 10:22 pm

Well, if Tim Burton didn't make it, then I don't know who did.
Back to top Go down
...



Posts : 1137
Join date : 2008-11-15

PostSubject: Re: The 100 Greatest Directors of All-Time   Sun Nov 22, 2009 10:15 am

tamartin
Posted: Sat Oct 20, 2007 10:58 pm

jbcoops wrote:
Good top ten there... I'd have to say that Orson Welles belongs there somewhere... and although Chaplin was a genius, Buster Keaton was a better director. Not sure if either one will make Whammon's Top 10 though.

Oh yeah... Wham... include "Dark Star" on John Carpenter's list. I think he did it as his masters thesis... dark comedy sci-fi... I loved it... others may disagree.

I see your point about Keaton, and I would consider bumping either Huston or Kubrick in favor of him, but Chaplin stays in the top ten. When I went through a silents phase, I honestly had to say Chaplin's movies while not as kinetic as Keaton's were a lot more emotionally satisfying. I think we're more used to thinking of The Little Tramp as an icon rather than a fictional character and therefore we lose a lot of the depth of that character.
Back to top Go down
...



Posts : 1137
Join date : 2008-11-15

PostSubject: Re: The 100 Greatest Directors of All-Time   Sun Nov 22, 2009 10:16 am

whammon
Posted: Sat Oct 20, 2007 11:12 pm

jbcoops wrote:
Good top ten there... I'd have to say that Orson Welles belongs there somewhere... and although Chaplin was a genius, Buster Keaton was a better director. Not sure if either one will make Whammon's Top 10 though.

Oh yeah... Wham... include "Dark Star" on John Carpenter's list. I think he did it as his masters thesis... dark comedy sci-fi... I loved it... others may disagree.

I almost included it, then at the last second dropped it. I'll add it back in.

Also, another rule for the Top 10 guesses. Once you make your guess, that's it until the second chance. TA, since you didn't know that, I'll allow you to change your guess if you choose to do so, but only once, and bear in mind, you may already be right. The only way you'll know if you're wrong is if you see one of your names on the list before the Top 10.
Back to top Go down
Sponsored content




PostSubject: Re: The 100 Greatest Directors of All-Time   

Back to top Go down
 
The 100 Greatest Directors of All-Time
View previous topic View next topic Back to top 
Page 4 of 6Go to page : Previous  1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6  Next
 Similar topics
-
» An Ode to Greatest Directors
» The Greatest XV of all time
» The Greatest Fan Fiction of All Time!
» Time Out by CL
» Watching "Genesis of the Daleks" for the first time.

Permissions in this forum:You cannot reply to topics in this forum
The James Gang Bar & Grill Forum Index :: MEMBERS SECTION :: Wham's Freakin' Sweet Collection-
Jump to: